My Bookish Wishlist 2017

In the run-up to the holidays, a number of new releases have caught my eye, so I thought that I would compile a shortlist of the books I’m eager to read. From some classic YA novels to those hot off the press, the books on this list have really stood out to me. If you have any books that you have enjoyed recently or novels that you think should be on the list, let me know in the comments !

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I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson – book review

I'll Give You the Sun

Like most twins, Jude and Noah are very close, but that changes when an unimaginable tragedy tears them apart. As they both struggle to cope with the grief and loss of the situation, they find themselves able to discover what they truly want and how they can come to terms with the disaster that has struck their family. When they begin to fall in love with boys they can’t have, they start to realise that love is complicated, whether it’s with your own family or the new boy in town.

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My Top Three Female YA Protagonists

I’ve been blogging for about 3 years now, and in my time reviewing books, I have noticed the different ways in which female protagonists are presented. It can be so inspiring to read about a good female lead in a book, especially if they can defy all odds and push back against any adversity. I’ve chosen 3 women/teens girls of the many characters that are out there that have appeared in YA literature and I believe to be good examples of strong women. So, without further ado…

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The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

the hate you give

In Thomas’ debut novel, we meet Starr, a teenager who has learnt to act differently in the two worlds she lives in: a poor neighbourhood struggling with gang crime and the contrasting private school she attends in the suburbs. Her life changes completely when she is the sole witness to the fatal shooting of Khalil, her best friend who was unarmed when a police officer pulled the trigger. She is soon dragged into protests and riots as she struggles to make the officer pay for what he did and bring justice for Khalil.

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My favourite reads of 2016

Hello! Alyssa here.  As fictionforteens.com enters its 3rd year I thought I’d look back through by book reviews from the past year and pick out my favourites for you. Please click on the title of each book to see the full review.

Say her name, Juno Dawson 

say hey name

Say her name is based around the legend of Bloody Mary, but with a twist. A group of teenagers try to summon the ghost of Bloody Mary, unaware of the consequences. The tension in the book grew as the story went on, making it very gripping. The plot twists were completely unpredictable as the reason behind the events in the book were slowly revealed.

Chaos Walking trilogy:

The Knife of Never Letting Go

The Ask and the Answer

Monsters of Men

By Patrick Ness

the knife of never letting go

After reading other books by Patrick Ness and really enjoying them, I was eager to read the Chaos Walking trilogy. I really like the writing style and the vivid characters which really came to life, especially Todd, the protagonist of the trilogy. I saw A Monster Calls In the cinema last week and absolutely loved it, so I’ve bought the book and I will review it soon. 

City of Bones by Cassandra Clare 

city-of-bones

City of Bones is the story of Clary Fray who finds out that she is a Shadowhunter, half-angel demon slayers tasked with keeping the human world safe. Clary and her friends encounter vampires, warlocks and werewolves in this action-packed fantasy novel. I’ve already begun reading the second book, City of Ashes which I’m enjoying so far.

Are there any books you’ve enjoyed recently? Please let me know in the comments!

The Pomegranate Tree by Vanessa Altin

the-pomegranate-tree

Sitting in a sunny courtyard under a pomegranate tree, Dilvan Haco, a kurdish teenager, struggles to come to terms with what she saw earlier. A kurdish soldier called Rehana gives her a diary, and tells her to write down everything that happens to her, from leaving her village to watching her mother being kidnapped, because one day, the world will want to hear her story…From that day onwards, Dilvan keeps a diary as a testament to what happens to her and family.

This book describes the beautiful scenery perfectly, with a very contrasting subject matter. Most importantly, it shows the effect of war on children like Dilvan and her family, and it was an eye-opening for me to read. Dilvan and Rehana were inspirational characters, always positive and strong, confident female role models. It is such a powerful book that I couldn’t put down. .

I would whole-heartedly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in world affairs or if you are interested in other cultures around the world.

My next review will be Monsters of Men, the conclusion to the Chaos Walking Trilogy.